odditiesoflife:

Curious History:  The “Notificator”; A Vintage Form of Twitter, 1935
An article from Modern Mechanix advertises the “notificator”. Hand write a message, drop in a coin, and the message moves behind a glass panel remaining in view for a couple of hours for a friend to read.
Again the past predicts the future. Maybe the old adage “there is nothing new under the sun” really does hold true. The needs of society have always been the same. Its the technological developments that morph the form of how we fulfill those needs. So what’s after Twitter? Sending messages via brain implants? Technological telekinesis? We’ll know soon enough.

odditiesoflife:

Curious History:  The “Notificator”; A Vintage Form of Twitter, 1935

An article from Modern Mechanix advertises the “notificator”. Hand write a message, drop in a coin, and the message moves behind a glass panel remaining in view for a couple of hours for a friend to read.

Again the past predicts the future. Maybe the old adage “there is nothing new under the sun” really does hold true. The needs of society have always been the same. Its the technological developments that morph the form of how we fulfill those needs. So what’s after Twitter? Sending messages via brain implants? Technological telekinesis? We’ll know soon enough.

(via pricklylegs)

huffingtonpost:

“After five years on Facebook, Maxine Guttmann, 15, just isn’t that into it.

She visits Facebook less frequently than ever — mostly to instant message with friends — and while she updates her Tumblr blog daily, it’s been “weeks” since she’s shared on Facebook.

“When I was little, Facebook was the coolest thing to do. And I as got older, it got stupider and I have more commitments,” said Guttmann, a rising junior in New York City. “On Tumblr, I feel like I can post all the stuff I’m interested in. On Facebook, not all my friends are interested in the same stuff I am. And a lot aren’t even my close friends anymore.”

Amid doubts following Facebook’s disappointing public offering, teens have been a bright spot for the social network. Co-founder Mark Zuckerberg might not have figured out how to maintain ad revenue momentum or adapt to cellphones, but with 93 percent of 12- to 17-year-old social media users on Facebook, it’s long been assumed this young army of digital natives would build a solid foundation for Facebook.”

I think we’re all taking these social media sites too seriously. Imagine a similar story about the office water cooler. “When I first started working here, I used to love swapping jokes and funny stories by the water cooler. But now we got this new espresso machine, and the only guy who really hangs out at the water cooler is Gary and he’s…yeah…So I don’t hang out at the water cooler anymore.”

Social media sites are a really great way for us to share the content we create and the content we love, as well as communicate in a way we enjoy. But more and more I am seeing people talk about them like they are critical to our existence. 

They ain’t. 

collegehumor:

Staff Jokes - July 12, 2013
jensorensen:

“App-sessive Compulsive” by Jen Sorensen
This cartoon probably comes off as more curmudgeonly than I am in real life, since I’ve been a little app-sessive myself lately. I’m a fan of Evernote, which I use to jot down cartoon ideas or information while I’m on the go. Recently, Evernote released specialized apps for remembering meals and people you meet, both of which I would probably find cool and useful. But then I got to thinking: how much time do I really want to spend interrupting life in order to peck away at my phone? Can one no longer enjoy an immersive experience with a plate of Drunken Noodles without getting all meta-noodly?
Okay, maybe I’ll make a note if they’re really good. But down that path obsessive content creation lies.

jensorensen:

“App-sessive Compulsive” by Jen Sorensen

This cartoon probably comes off as more curmudgeonly than I am in real life, since I’ve been a little app-sessive myself lately. I’m a fan of Evernote, which I use to jot down cartoon ideas or information while I’m on the go. Recently, Evernote released specialized apps for remembering meals and people you meet, both of which I would probably find cool and useful. But then I got to thinking: how much time do I really want to spend interrupting life in order to peck away at my phone? Can one no longer enjoy an immersive experience with a plate of Drunken Noodles without getting all meta-noodly?

Okay, maybe I’ll make a note if they’re really good. But down that path obsessive content creation lies.

collegehumor:

Staff Jokes: HumorUs

Living And Working In Beta

oylspill:

When I first started in advertising, the industry was at the tail end of a very classical period. Projects would often take over a year, and the deliverables were primarily magazine ads and television commercials.

Anything on the Internet was considered a geeky experiment and not to be trusted. I joined Twitter during its first year, and I remember suggesting using it for a campaign. I was roundly laughed out of the room for my naivety. The same thing happened with proposing a campaign that would work entirely on Facebook.

Refresh your browser to today, when Twitter and Facebook have become a core consideration on every single advertising brief. Gone are the year-long concepting grinds. Replaced by a new kind of fluid client-agency partnership that takes incredible collaboration to meet the ever quickening deadlines. The process is often chaotic during the making of these things, but when the dust settles, we have projects that everyone takes pride in.

I think the model for advertising used to model the process cycle of filmmaking and the fine arts. But as technology has tipped into mainstream ubiquity, the advertising model I find myself operating in is closer to developing, programming and hacking. It’s our job to bring as much taste and aesthetics to this process, but you need to shift your mind into a perpetual beta state to keep up. The rules of the digital landscape are being written on a daily basis, so there can be seismic shifts mid-production, or even after launch. If you don’t find a way to cope with that new reality, you’ll go mad, and your projects will never be realized.

I find myself creating ‘theories’ more than concepts these days. While I always start from a core idea, I try to keep my mind loose, to be receptive to a range of executional options. I also try to use as many digital platforms and tools as possible, so that I constantly know where the edges of the playing field are.

It’s impossible to predict where tomorrow’s innovation will take us. All we can do is stay fluid and adapt. All we can do is be water, my friend. We can’t predict the future, but we can be smart about building a mobile foundation that will be able to react and take advantage of this constantly evolving digital landscape.

Vint Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist at Google, and a founding father of the Internet, discusses the next version of the Internet, IPv6, and why we need it. 

Basically, we’re running out of space for our pics of kittens and corgis.


The Technology of Comedy

Last night I realized something fascinating about myself. As I sat at my iMac having a Google Hangout with Sam working on turning a joke into a Tumblr post, I realized I love the combination of technology and comedy. 

Since I can remember I’ve wanted to make people laugh. I’m obsessed with it. I’ve also always loved technology and I spent 3 years working for Apple, maybe the biggest technology company in history. I am just now realizing how much technology and comedy have in common. 

Comedy and Technology are essentially about the same thing. They are both about solving a problem. Comedy is about solving the specific problem of how to make somebody laugh. Language is the main tool we use. We work to put words together in such a way that they surprise the audience. 

Tumblr is the technology I use to solve the problem of not being able to reach an audience. Tumblr has given me the ability to reach numbers of people that I never could on a live stage. 

For a long time I thought my path was supposed to be the typical path of a stand up comedian who performs live shows until he catches a break and gets into television or movies. 

But last night, as I worked on creating a post that exploits the specific technology of the Tumblr photoset, I realized that maybe I was always meant to be an “Internet comedian.” Maybe using technology to create, publish, and share my humor is the path I was always meant to take. 

On one hand, it is hard to compete with the immediate feedback and the rush you get when you make a live audience laugh. On the other hand, I’ve never performed for 20,000 people, but jokes I’ve made on Tumblr have been viewed and “liked” by that many people. 

I’ve always loved comedy because it feels like I’m cracking some sort of code. You start with a premise for a joke. It’s a good start, but it’s not funny yet. Then you take what you words and actions and find a way to apply them in order to achieve the maximum result. 

Last night I realized Sam and I were doing that exact same thing, only with a Tumblr photoset. And when the post was created and it was exactly what we hoped it would be, it was one of the most satisfying feelings I’ve ever had. 

slacktory:

If you were around for dial-up modems, you resent people who don’t know dial-up modem sounds.
If you don’t know dial-up modem sounds, then right now you are probably slouched in a chair, texting your BFFs.
Great, now I’m cranky for no reason. Thanks, old modem sounds.
Bonus: Dial-up modem sounds!

slacktory:

If you were around for dial-up modems, you resent people who don’t know dial-up modem sounds.

If you don’t know dial-up modem sounds, then right now you are probably slouched in a chair, texting your BFFs.

Great, now I’m cranky for no reason. Thanks, old modem sounds.

Bonus: Dial-up modem sounds!